Hans Kelsen on Judicial Law-Making by International Courts and Tribunals: A Theory of Global Judicial Imperialism?

13 Pages Posted: 31 Dec 2015

See all articles by Jochen von Bernstorff

Jochen von Bernstorff

Max Planck Society for the Advancement of the Sciences - Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law

Date Written: December 31, 2015

Abstract

This paper examines Hans Kelsen's theory of international adjudication and its political implications in the context of Kelsen's post-war calls for compulsory jurisdiction. It defends Kelsen's position on judicial law-making against claims by scholars such as Hardt and Negri that it amounts to a theory of 'judicial imperialism'. The paper, to finish, examines the ramifications of Kelsen's theory of compulsory jurisdiction in times of fragmentation.

Keywords: Hans Kelsen; international courts and tribunals; theory of adjudication; judicial lawmaking; compulsory jurisdiction; Hardt and Negri; judicial imperialism; fragmentation

Suggested Citation

von Bernstorff, Jochen, Hans Kelsen on Judicial Law-Making by International Courts and Tribunals: A Theory of Global Judicial Imperialism? (December 31, 2015). European Society of International Law (ESIL) 2015 Annual Conference (Oslo). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2709624 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2709624

Jochen Von Bernstorff (Contact Author)

Max Planck Society for the Advancement of the Sciences - Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law ( email )

INF 535
Heidelberg, 69123
Germany

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