If it Tastes Bad it Must Be Good: Consumer Naïve Theories and the Marketing Placebo Effect

Intern. J. of Research in Marketing, 30 (2013) 197–198

Posted: 4 Jan 2016

See all articles by Scott A. Wright

Scott A. Wright

Providence College

José da Costa Hernandez

Centro Universitário da FEI

Aparna Sundar

University of Oregon - Department of Marketing

John Bowman Dinsmore

University of Cincinnati

Frank R. Kardes

University of Cincinnati - Department of Marketing

Date Written: January 3, 2016

Abstract

The original marketing placebo effect study shows that high price increases consumers' expectations and enhances behavioral performance (Shiv, Carmon, & Ariely, 2005). We find that several non-price variables (set size, scarcity, packaging, and taste) conceptually replicate this effect. Consumers hold naïve theories about the possible influence of many marketing variables, and these theories influence subjective beliefs and objective behavior.

Keywords: Naive Theories, Placebo Effect

Suggested Citation

Wright, Scott A. and da Costa Hernandez, José and Sundar, Aparna and Dinsmore, John Bowman and Kardes, Frank R., If it Tastes Bad it Must Be Good: Consumer Naïve Theories and the Marketing Placebo Effect (January 3, 2016). Intern. J. of Research in Marketing, 30 (2013) 197–198. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2710375

Scott A. Wright (Contact Author)

Providence College ( email )

United States

José Da Costa Hernandez

Centro Universitário da FEI ( email )

Av. Humberto de Alencar Castelo Branco, 3972
São Bernardo do Campo, SP 09850-901
Brazil

Aparna Sundar

University of Oregon - Department of Marketing ( email )

United States

HOME PAGE: http://https://business.uoregon.edu/faculty/aparna-sundar

John Bowman Dinsmore

University of Cincinnati ( email )

Cincinnati, OH 45221-0389
United States

Frank R. Kardes

University of Cincinnati - Department of Marketing ( email )

United States

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