Fine as North Dakota Wine: Sensory Expectations and the Intake of Companion Foods

Physiology and Behavior, 90:5 (April 2007), 712-16

20 Pages Posted: 10 Jan 2016

See all articles by Brian Wansink

Brian Wansink

Retired

Collin R. Payne

Cornell University

Jill North

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Date Written: November 22, 2006

Abstract

Although taste expectations can influence taste evaluation, can such an environmental cue have a referred impact on the intake volume of companion foods? Adult diners who ordered a prix-fixe restaurant meal were given a complimentary glass of wine that had been relabeled to induce either favorable (“new from California”) or unfavorable (“new from North Dakota”) taste expectations. An analysis of plate waste indicated that those who believed they had been drinking California wine ate 12% more of their meal than those who instead believed they drank North Dakota wine. In combination with a sensory based lab study, these results show that environmental cues – such as label induced sensory expectations – can have a far-reaching impact on the food intake of companion foods.

Keywords: food intake, wine, sensory expectations, expectations, labels, taste ratings, sensory halo, halo, environmental cues, quality cues

Suggested Citation

Wansink, Brian and Payne, Collin R. and North, Jill, Fine as North Dakota Wine: Sensory Expectations and the Intake of Companion Foods (November 22, 2006). Physiology and Behavior, 90:5 (April 2007), 712-16, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2710766

Brian Wansink (Contact Author)

Retired ( email )

607-319-0123 (Phone)

Collin R. Payne

Cornell University ( email )

Ithaca, NY 14853
United States

Jill North

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ( email )

601 E John St
Champaign, IL 61820
United States

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