The Sweet Tooth Hypothesis: How Fruit Consumption Relates to Snack Consumption

47:1 (July), Appetite, 107-110

13 Pages Posted: 21 Jan 2016

Date Written: July 7, 2005

Abstract

Building on prior work related to taste preferences of fruit lovers, we investigate the “sweet tooth” hypothesis. First, using CSFII survey data, we show that fruit consumption is more highly related to sweet snack consumption than it is to salty snack consumption. Second, a follow-up study with a different population supports the relationship by showing that sweet snack consumption is more related to fruit consumption than it is to vegetable consumption. Knowing that people who frequently eat sweet snacks may be predisposed to increasing their fruit consumption will enable better targeting and tailoring of educational efforts, such as those used in the 5-a-Day for Better Health campaign.

Keywords: Fruit and Vegetables, Five-a-Day, Sweet Snacks, Salty Snacks, Taste Profiles

Suggested Citation

Wansink, Brian and Bascoul, Ganaël and Chen, Gary T, The Sweet Tooth Hypothesis: How Fruit Consumption Relates to Snack Consumption (July 7, 2005). 47:1 (July), Appetite, 107-110, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2710859

Brian Wansink (Contact Author)

Retired ( email )

607-319-0123 (Phone)

Ganaël Bascoul

Independent

Gary T Chen

Independent ( email )

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