Appetite for Destruction: Hunger Leads to Less Healthy Food Choices

JAMA Internal Medicine, 2013

8 Pages Posted: 12 Jan 2016

See all articles by Aner Tal

Aner Tal

Cornell University, Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Students

Brian Wansink

Retired

Date Written: November 15, 2012

Abstract

Fasting is a common phenomenon and can either be intended or unintended [1]. It can be self-imposed in the case of extreme dieting, religious fasts, and chaotic work schedules [2-3]. It can be medically-imposed in the case of fasting before blood draws or surgery [4]. In extreme cases, it can be caused by external circumstances such as food shortages, natural disasters, or poverty [5]. Food deprivation has been shown to alter the quantity of food people buy or consume [6-7]. However, little attention has been given to how fasting affects the composition of people’s food choices. Do people simply buy more when they are food deprived, or do they specifically increase purchases of high-calorie, relative to low-calorie foods?

Keywords: Fasting, food selection, hunger, food deprivation, purchasing behavior, consumer research, consumer behavior

Suggested Citation

Tal, Aner and Wansink, Brian, Appetite for Destruction: Hunger Leads to Less Healthy Food Choices (November 15, 2012). JAMA Internal Medicine, 2013, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2711374

Aner Tal

Cornell University, Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Students ( email )

Ithaca, NY
United States

Brian Wansink (Contact Author)

Retired ( email )

607-319-0123 (Phone)

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
38
Abstract Views
487
PlumX Metrics