How Pantry Stockpiling Influences the Usage Frequency of a Brand

Wansink, Brian and Rohit Deshpandé (1994), “‘Out of Sight, Out of Mind’: The Impact of Household Stockpiling on Usage Rates,” Marketing Letters, 5:1 (January), 91-100.

15 Pages Posted: 13 Jan 2016 Last revised: 27 Apr 2017

See all articles by Brian Wansink

Brian Wansink

Retired

Rohit Deshpande

Harvard Business School - Marketing Unit

Date Written: July 1, 1992

Abstract

Both researchers and managers have suggested that price promotion-induced stockpiling can increase a household’s usage frequency of a product. Empirical evidence of any stockpiling effect, however, is mixed. In reconciling the inconsistent findings of these empirical studies, this paper shows that stockpiling only increases a person’s usage of a product when that person has highly salient thoughts of the product. This model and these findings have critical implications for the advertising versus promotion debate. They suggest that consumer promotions and advertising play a joint and complementary role in increasing usage: promotions by encouraging stockpiling, and advertising by building the salience needed to deplete the stockpiled inventory.

Keywords: stockpiling, usage frequency, salience, versatility

Suggested Citation

Wansink, Brian and Deshpande, Rohit, How Pantry Stockpiling Influences the Usage Frequency of a Brand (July 1, 1992). Wansink, Brian and Rohit Deshpandé (1994), “‘Out of Sight, Out of Mind’: The Impact of Household Stockpiling on Usage Rates,” Marketing Letters, 5:1 (January), 91-100., Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2711768

Brian Wansink (Contact Author)

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607-319-0123 (Phone)

Rohit Deshpande

Harvard Business School - Marketing Unit ( email )

Soldiers Field
Boston, MA 02163
United States
617-495-5449 (Phone)
617-496-5853 (Fax)

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