Stop Spoon Dosing: Milliliter Instructions Reduce Inclination to Spoon Dosing

Van Ittersum, Koert and Brian Wansink (2016), “Stop Spoon Dosing: Milliliter Instructions May Cause Fewer Dosage Errors than Spoon Instructions on Liquid Medication,” BMC Research Notes, 9:33. doi: 10.1186/s13104-015-1809-1.

6 Pages Posted: 7 Jan 2016 Last revised: 28 Apr 2017

Date Written: January 6, 2016

Abstract

Background: Does the use of teaspoon units in dose recommendations on Drug Facts panels of liquid medicine lead to dosing errors and could any such errors be reduced if millimeter units were used instead?

Findings: Participants given dosing instructions in teaspoon units were twice as likely to choose a kitchen teaspoon as those given instructions in milliliter units (31.3% vs. 15.4%).

Conclusion: Our results suggest that spoon usage — and the inherent risk of dosage errors — could be reduced by more than 50% simply by changing the units of measurement given in dosing instructions.

Keywords: liquid medicine, dosage errors, spoon dosing, milliliters, medicine labels

Suggested Citation

van Ittersum, Koert and Wansink, Brian, Stop Spoon Dosing: Milliliter Instructions Reduce Inclination to Spoon Dosing (January 6, 2016). Van Ittersum, Koert and Brian Wansink (2016), “Stop Spoon Dosing: Milliliter Instructions May Cause Fewer Dosage Errors than Spoon Instructions on Liquid Medication,” BMC Research Notes, 9:33. doi: 10.1186/s13104-015-1809-1.. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2711811

Koert Van Ittersum

University of Groningen ( email )

Postbus 72
9700 AB Groningen
Netherlands

Brian Wansink (Contact Author)

Cornell University ( email )

Ithaca, NY 14853
United States

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