An Electrochemical Immunobiosensor for Direct Detection of Veterinary Drug Residues in Undiluted Complex Matrices

Electroanalysis, Vol. 23, Issue 8, p. 1797–1804, June 2011

Posted: 7 Jul 2017

See all articles by Sook Mei Khor

Sook Mei Khor

University of Malaya (UM) - Department of Chemistry

Guozhen Liu

University of New South Wales (UNSW), Faculty of Engineering, Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering, ARC Centre of Excellent for Nanoscale Bipphotonics

Joshua Peterson

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - School of Chemistry

Sridhar Iyengar

AgaMatrix, Inc.

J. Gooding

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology

Date Written: April 7, 2011

Abstract

An electrochemical immunobiosensor is developed that allows the detection of small molecules, such as drugs, in undiluted complex samples, with no washing or rinsing steps via a displacement assay. This is achieved using an interface comprised of a mixed layer of oligo(phenylethynylene) molecular wire (MW), to allow electrochemical communication, and oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) to control the interaction of proteins and electroactive interferences with the electrode surface. The mixed layer is formed from in situ-generated aryl diazonium cations. To the distal end of the MW, a redox probe 1,1’-di(aminomethyl)ferrocene (FDMA) is attached followed by an epitope (the structural feature the antibody selectively recognizes) to which an antibody would bind. Association or dissociation of the antibody with the sensing interface causes a modulation of the ferrocene electrochemistry. Antibody complexed electrodes are exposed to samples containing spiked enrofloxacin (unbound target analyte), in milk and environmental water and interrogated using square wave voltammetry (SWV). The lowest detected concentration of free enrofloxacin was 10 pg mL-1 in phosphate buffer, 50 mM, pH 7. For free enrofloxacin detection in undiluted complex matrices, by adding disodium EDTA (50 mM), the recovery obtained was 94.1% in skim milk and 88.5% in stream water, respectively as compared to clean phosphate buffer. The immunobiosensor response time was 10–15 minutes. The sensor performance in milk was shown to be superior to a standard method based on Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS).

Keywords: Electrochemical Immunobiosensor, Veterinary Drug Residue, Complex Matrices, Small Molecules, User Intervention Free

JEL Classification: I1, I10

Suggested Citation

Khor, Sook Mei and Liu, Guozhen and Peterson, Joshua and Iyengar, Sridhar and Gooding, J., An Electrochemical Immunobiosensor for Direct Detection of Veterinary Drug Residues in Undiluted Complex Matrices (April 7, 2011). Electroanalysis, Vol. 23, Issue 8, p. 1797–1804, June 2011, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2712124

Sook Mei Khor (Contact Author)

University of Malaya (UM) - Department of Chemistry ( email )

Kuala Lumpur, Wilayah Persekutuan 50603
Kuala Lumpur, Wilayah Persekutuan 50603
Malaysia

Guozhen Liu

University of New South Wales (UNSW), Faculty of Engineering, Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering, ARC Centre of Excellent for Nanoscale Bipphotonics ( email )

Sydney
Australia

Joshua Peterson

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - School of Chemistry ( email )

Australia

Sridhar Iyengar

AgaMatrix, Inc.

7C Raymond Ave
Salem, NH 03079
United States

J. Gooding

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology ( email )

Australia

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