Sensory Tests that Predict Consumer Acceptance

Wansink, Brian (2003), “Measuring Consumer Response to Food Products: Sensory Tests that Predict Consumer Acceptance,” Food Quality and Preference, 14:1 (January), 23-26

8 Pages Posted: 13 Jan 2016

Date Written: January 13, 2002

Abstract

As noted by Garber, Hyatt, and Starr (2002), high sensory and taste ratings do not directly translate into the purchase, consumption, or market success of a product. Indeed, there often appears to be a reasonable gap between such tests and market success (Foley 1994). Segmentation differences, consumer suggestibility, and measurement relevance all limit the value of sensory tests to brand managers and marketers. They also unfortunately compromise the tremendous potential value that sensory researchers can have to a firm and to a product’s ultimate market success.

Building on Garber et al (2002), measurement methods and analysis can be modified to more directly take factors in to account that might influence the purchase, consumption, and market success of a product. The focus will be on accounting for segmentation differences, consumer suggestibility, and measurement relevance.

Keywords: sensory tests, taste rating, segmentation differences, suggestibility, marketing, consumer behavior, consumer research, labeling

Suggested Citation

Wansink, Brian, Sensory Tests that Predict Consumer Acceptance (January 13, 2002). Wansink, Brian (2003), “Measuring Consumer Response to Food Products: Sensory Tests that Predict Consumer Acceptance,” Food Quality and Preference, 14:1 (January), 23-26, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2713824

Brian Wansink (Contact Author)

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