Counting Bones: Environmental Cues of Consumed Food Decreases Food Intake

Perceptual and Motor Skills, 104 (March), 273-7

8 Pages Posted: 16 Jan 2016

Date Written: September 20, 2006

Abstract

A field experiment tested the hypothesis that evidence of the amount one has eaten may lead people to eat less. Male (n=16) and female (n=34) graduate students (mean age=24.1) at a party were seated at 21 tables that were randomly assigned to be bussed (leftover wings removed and new wings served) or unbussed (wings left on table). Overall, students at the bussed tables ate more than those at the unbussed tables (7 wings versus 5.5 wings). This effect was stronger for men than women. Interestingly, when their table was bussed, students estimated that they ate less than they actually did. In distracting eating environments, environmental cues may provide an effective means of reducing consumption.

Keywords: food consumption, environmental cues, food selection, intake estimation, chicken wings

Suggested Citation

Wansink, Brian and Payne, Collin R., Counting Bones: Environmental Cues of Consumed Food Decreases Food Intake (September 20, 2006). Perceptual and Motor Skills, 104 (March), 273-7, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2714549

Brian Wansink (Contact Author)

Retired ( email )

607-319-0123 (Phone)

Collin R. Payne

Cornell University ( email )

Ithaca, NY 14853
United States

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