Biosecurity Terrorism, Food Safety, and Food Consumption: Using Experimental Psychology to Analyze Economic Behavior

Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, 34:1, 91-108, 2009

35 Pages Posted: 16 Jan 2016

See all articles by David Just

David Just

Cornell University - Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management

Brian Wansink

Retired

Calum G. Turvey

Cornell University - School of Applied Economics and Management

Date Written: February 3, 2008

Abstract

How would a possible food safety scare influence food consumption? Using techniques from experimental psychology, a study of 103 lunchtime participants suggests that a food scare -- avian influenza -- would decrease food by 17% if they believed it was naturally occurring and by 26% if they believed it was the result of terrorism. We argue that experimental psychology is essential when attempting to study behavior in areas such as food safety where hypothetical scenarios and surveys would not capture true assessments of risk and emotional-response.

Keywords: food scares, epidemics, experimental psychology, bioterrorism, food consumption, consumer behavior, food safety, food crises

Suggested Citation

Just, David and Wansink, Brian and Turvey, Calum G., Biosecurity Terrorism, Food Safety, and Food Consumption: Using Experimental Psychology to Analyze Economic Behavior (February 3, 2008). Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, 34:1, 91-108, 2009, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2714553

David Just

Cornell University - Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management ( email )

Ithaca, NY
United States
6072552086 (Phone)

Brian Wansink (Contact Author)

Retired ( email )

607-319-0123 (Phone)

Calum G. Turvey

Cornell University - School of Applied Economics and Management ( email )

248 Warren Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853
United States

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