Justice Reinvestment: Winding Back Imprisonment

Brown, Cunneen,Schwartz, Stubbs and Young, Justice Reinvestment: Winding Back Imprisonment, Palgrave Macmillan (2016)

UNSW Law Research Paper No. 2016-02

Posted: 15 Jan 2016 Last revised: 24 Jul 2016

See all articles by David Bentley Brown

David Bentley Brown

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - Faculty of Law

Chris Cunneen

Jumbunna Institute for Indigenous Education and Research,University of Technology Sydney; University of New South Wales, School of Social Sciences; James Cook University - Cairns Campus

Melanie Schwartz

University of New South Wales (UNSW)

Julie Stubbs

University of New South Wales (UNSW, Australia) - Faculty of Law

Courtney Young

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - Faculty of Law

Date Written: 2016

Abstract

Justice reinvestment was introduced as a response to mass incarceration and racial disparity in the United States in 2003. This book examines justice reinvestment from its origins, its potential as a mechanism for winding back imprisonment rates, and its portability to Australia, the United Kingdom and beyond. The authors analyze the principles and processes of justice reinvestment, including the early neighborhood focus on 'million dollar blocks'. They further scrutinize the claims of evidence-based and data-driven policy, which have been used in the practical implementation strategies featured in bipartisan legislative criminal justice system reforms.

This book takes a comparative approach to justice reinvestment by examining the differences in political, legal and cultural contexts between the United States and Australia in particular. It argues for a community-driven approach, originating in vulnerable Indigenous communities with high imprisonment rates, as part of a more general movement for Indigenous democracy. While supporting a social justice approach, the book confronts significantly the problematic features of the politics of locality and community, the process of criminal justice policy transfer, and rationalist conceptions of policy. It will be essential reading for scholars, students and practitioners of criminal justice and criminal law.

Keywords: justice reinvestment, mass incarceration, racial disparity, data, United States, Australia, indigenous communities, social justice, politics, criminal justice

Suggested Citation

Brown, David Bentley and Cunneen, Chris and Schwartz, Melanie and Stubbs, Julie and Young, Courtney, Justice Reinvestment: Winding Back Imprisonment (2016). Brown, Cunneen,Schwartz, Stubbs and Young, Justice Reinvestment: Winding Back Imprisonment, Palgrave Macmillan (2016); UNSW Law Research Paper No. 2016-02. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2715297

David Bentley Brown

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - Faculty of Law ( email )

Sydney, NSW 2052
Australia
+61 2 9385 2262 (Phone)
+61 2 9385 1175 (Fax)

Chris Cunneen

Jumbunna Institute for Indigenous Education and Research,University of Technology Sydney ( email )

15 Broadway, Ultimo
PO Box 123
Sydney, NSW 2007
Australia

University of New South Wales, School of Social Sciences ( email )

Kensington, New South Wales 2052
Australia

James Cook University - Cairns Campus ( email )

PO Box 6811
Cairns, Queensland 4870
Australia

Melanie Schwartz

University of New South Wales (UNSW) ( email )

Kensington
High St
Sydney, NSW 2052
Australia

Julie Stubbs (Contact Author)

University of New South Wales (UNSW, Australia) - Faculty of Law ( email )

Kensington
High St
Sydney, NSW 2052
Australia

Courtney Young

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - Faculty of Law ( email )

Kensington, New South Wales 2052
Australia

HOME PAGE: http://justicereinvestment.unsw.edu.au

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