When Remembering Disrupts Knowing: Blocking Implicit Price Memory

Conditionally accepted at the Journal of Marketing Research, Forthcoming

Tuck School of Business Working Paper No. 2720391

52 Pages Posted: 22 Jan 2016

See all articles by Ellie Kyung

Ellie Kyung

Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth

Manoj Thomas

Cornell University - Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management

Date Written: January 22, 2016

Abstract

Does explicit recall help or hurt memory-based comparisons? It is often assumed that attempting to recall information from memory should facilitate - or at least not disrupt - memory-based comparisons. Using the domain of price comparisons, the authors demonstrate that memory-based price comparisons are less accurate when consumers first attempt to recall the past price versus when they do not try to do so. Attempting - and failing at - explicit price recall focuses attention on metacognitive experience, resulting in a feeling-of-not-knowing which then blocks the implicit memory that people could otherwise use to make accurate price comparisons. Drawing attention to the metacognitive feeling increases the blocking effect of recall on implicit memory. Drawing attention away from the feeling reduces the blocking effect. The results identify a new type of memory blocking - metacognitive memory blocking - wherein the feeling-of-not-knowing blocks implicit memory during judgments. They also provide further evidence of dual representations of price memory and demonstrate that most memory-based price comparisons are based on implicit memory and do not entail explicit recall of the reference price.

Keywords: memory, blocking, metacognition, price memory, price recall, price comparison

Suggested Citation

Kyung, Ellie and Thomas, Manoj, When Remembering Disrupts Knowing: Blocking Implicit Price Memory (January 22, 2016). Conditionally accepted at the Journal of Marketing Research, Forthcoming, Tuck School of Business Working Paper No. 2720391, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2720391

Ellie Kyung (Contact Author)

Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth ( email )

Hanover, NH 03755
United States

Manoj Thomas

Cornell University - Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management ( email )

353 Sage Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853
United States
607-255-7207 (Phone)
607-254-4590 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://forum.johnson.cornell.edu/faculty/mthomas/

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Downloads
66
Abstract Views
362
rank
376,435
PlumX Metrics