Accounting for Taste: Prototypes that Predict Preference

Journal of Database Marketing, 7:4, 308-320, 2000

14 Pages Posted: 29 Jan 2016

See all articles by Brian Wansink

Brian Wansink

Cornell University

Sea Park

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Date Written: January 1, 2000

Abstract

External cues such as packaging and container size can powerfully and unknowingly increase how much food a person consumes. Do they still, however, stimulate consumption as the perceived favorability of a food declines? This was examined with popcorn in a theatre setting. Moviegoers who had rated the popcorn as tasting relatively unfavorable ate 61% more popcorn if randomly given a large container than a smaller one. Moviegoers who had rated the popcorn as relatively favorable ate 49% more when the container size was increased (and were likely to eat greater amounts if accompanied with a person of the opposite sex). One reason for this increase was that consumers had more difficulty monitoring how much they ate from large containers. Implications for raising the consumption levels of healthy, but unfavorable foods are investigated.

Keywords: external cues, popcorn, theater food, food consumption, consumer behavior

Suggested Citation

Wansink, Brian and Park, Sea, Accounting for Taste: Prototypes that Predict Preference (January 1, 2000). Journal of Database Marketing, 7:4, 308-320, 2000. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2723388

Brian Wansink (Contact Author)

Cornell University ( email )

Ithaca, NY 14853
United States

Sea Park

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ( email )

601 E John St
Champaign, IL 61820
United States

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