Sponsorship Disclosure and Consumer Deception: Experimental Evidence from Native Advertising in Mobile Search

49 Pages Posted: 25 Feb 2016 Last revised: 21 Apr 2018

See all articles by Navdeep S. Sahni

Navdeep S. Sahni

Stanford Graduate School of Business

Harikesh Nair

Stanford University - Graduate School of Business

Date Written: March 30, 2018

Abstract

Recent advances in advertising technology have lead to the development of “native advertising”, which is a format of advertising that mimics the other non-sponsored content on the medium. While advertisers have rapidly embraced the format on a variety of digital media, regulators have expressed serious concerns about whether this format materially deceives consumers because the advertising disclosure is incomplete or inappropriate. This has reignited a longstanding debate about the distinction between advertising and content in media markets, and how it affects consumers. This paper contributes to this debate by providing empirical evidence from a randomized experiment conducted on native advertising at a mobile restaurant-search platform. We experimentally vary the format of paid-search advertising, the extent to which ads are disclosed to over 200,000 users, and track their anonymized browsing behavior including clicks and conversions. The research design we propose uses comparisons of revealed preferences under experimentally manipulated treatment and control conditions to assess the potential for consumer confusion and deception. A design based on revealed preference speaks to the “material” standard of regulators; helps assess “confusion” while avoiding directly questioning consumers, and may be useful in other settings. Implementing the design, we find that native advertising benefits advertisers, and detect no evidence of deception under typically used formats of disclosure currently used in the paid-search marketplace. Further investigation shows that the incremental conversions due to advertising are not driven by users clicking on the native ads. Rather, the benefits from advertising are driven by users seeing the ads and later clicking on the advertiser's “organic” listings. Thus, we find little support of native advertising “tricking” users into clicking and driving them to advertisers as typically feared; instead, users seem to view ads and deliberately evaluate the advertisers. Further, mere exposure seems sufficient to produce most of the incremental effect of advertising.

Keywords: native advertising, online advertising, advertising and content, advertising disclosure, field experiment, randomized control trial, search advertising, mobile advertising

JEL Classification: M3, D18, K2

Suggested Citation

Sahni, Navdeep S. and Nair, Harikesh, Sponsorship Disclosure and Consumer Deception: Experimental Evidence from Native Advertising in Mobile Search (March 30, 2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2737035 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2737035

Navdeep S. Sahni (Contact Author)

Stanford Graduate School of Business ( email )

655 Knight Way
Stanford, CA 94305-5015
United States

Harikesh Nair

Stanford University - Graduate School of Business ( email )

655 Knight Way
Stanford, CA 94305-5015
United States
650-736-4256 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://faculty-gsb.stanford.edu/nair/index.html

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