Digitally Relevant Moderators of the Narrative Transportation Effect

38 Pages Posted: 7 Mar 2016 Last revised: 14 Jan 2018

See all articles by Tom van Laer

Tom van Laer

The University of Sydney

Stephanie Feiereisen

City University London - Sir John Cass Business School

Luca M. Visconti

ESCP Europe; USI Università della Svizzera italiana

Date Written: November 10, 2017

Abstract

Purpose – This paper pursues three primary objectives: (1) to integrate three digitally relevant moderators of the narrative transportation effect into the marketing literature, (2) to empirically assess the integrated model with a quantitative meta-analysis of extant research, and (3) to provide directions for marketing managers to enhance the narrative transportation effect in an evolving technological environment.

Design/methodology/approach – The paper contributes to the field by means of a meta-analysis of 64 articles featuring 138 narrative transportation effect sizes.

Findings – The research shows that the narrative transportation effect is stronger when the story (1) pertains to a commercial (vs. non-commercial) domain, (2) is user- (professional-) generated, and (3) is received by one story-receiver at a time.

Research and practical implications – The current study has implications for research and practice that are discussed and followed by directions for future research.

Originality/value – In the digital era, marketers increasingly use storytelling techniques to promote their brands, products, and services, and engage their customers. Extant research demonstrates that a story can enhance the narrative transportation effect, a type of customer engagement that has distinctive outcomes.

Keywords: Digital marketing, Meta-analysis, Narrative transportation, Social media, Story domain, Story-receiver, Storytelling, User-generated content

JEL Classification: M31

Suggested Citation

van Laer, Tom and Feiereisen, Stephanie and Visconti, Luca M. and Visconti, Luca M., Digitally Relevant Moderators of the Narrative Transportation Effect (November 10, 2017). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2742104

Tom Van Laer

The University of Sydney ( email )

University of Sydney
Sydney, NSW 2006
Australia

Stephanie Feiereisen (Contact Author)

City University London - Sir John Cass Business School ( email )

106 Bunhill Row
London, EC1Y 8TZ
United Kingdom

Luca M. Visconti

USI Università della Svizzera italiana ( email )

Via Buffi, 13
Lugano, TN 6900
Switzerland

ESCP Europe ( email )

79 Avenue de la Republique
Paris, 75011
France

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