Working-Time Mismatch and Mental Health

43 Pages Posted: 21 Mar 2016

See all articles by Steffen Otterbach

Steffen Otterbach

University of Hohenheim - Institute for Health Care & Public Management; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Mark Wooden

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Yin King Fok

University of Melbourne; University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Abstract

Nationally representative panel survey data for Germany and Australia are used to investigate the impact of working-time mismatches (i.e., differences between actual and desired work hours) on mental health, as measured by the Mental Component Summary Score from the SF-12. Fixed effects and dynamic linear models are estimated, which, together with the longitudinal nature of the data, enable person-specific traits that are time invariant to be controlled for. The incorporation of dynamics also reduces concerns about the potential effects of reverse causation. The results suggest that overemployment (working more hours than desired) has adverse consequences for the mental health of workers in both countries. Underemployment (working fewer hours than desired), however, seems to only be of significance in Australia.

Keywords: Australia, Germany, mental health, Mental Component Summary Score (SF-12), longitudinal data, work hours, working-time mismatch

JEL Classification: I12, J22

Suggested Citation

Otterbach, Steffen and Wooden, Mark and Fok, Yin King, Working-Time Mismatch and Mental Health. IZA Discussion Paper No. 9818. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2750301

Steffen Otterbach (Contact Author)

University of Hohenheim - Institute for Health Care & Public Management ( email )

Fruwirthstr. 48
Kavaliershaus 4 | 118
Stuttgart, 70599
Germany
+49(0)711-459-23425 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://https://hcecon.uni-hohenheim.de/64032?L=1

IZA Institute of Labor Economics ( email )

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

Mark Wooden

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research ( email )

Level 5, FBE Building, 111 Barry Street
Parkville, Victoria 3010
Australia

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

Yin King Fok

University of Melbourne ( email )

185 Pelham Street
Carlton, Victoria 3053
Australia

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research ( email )

Level 5, FBE Building, 111 Barry Street
Parkville, Victoria 3010
Australia

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
11
Abstract Views
139
PlumX Metrics