Corporate Resilience to Banking Crises: The Roles of Trust and Trade Credit

60 Pages Posted: 11 Apr 2016

See all articles by Ross Levine

Ross Levine

University of California, Berkeley - Haas School of Business; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Chen Lin

The University of Hong Kong - Faculty of Business and Economics

Wensi Xie

The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) - CUHK Business School

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Date Written: April 2016

Abstract

Are firms more resilient to systemic banking crises in economies with higher levels of social trust? Using firm-level data in 34 countries from 1990 through 2011, we find that liquidity-dependent firms in high-trust countries obtain more trade credit and suffer smaller drops in profits and employment during banking crises than similar firms in low-trust economies. The results are consistent with the view that when banking crises block the normal banking-lending channel, greater social trust facilitates access to informal finance, cushioning the effects of these crises on corporate profits and employment.

Suggested Citation

Levine, Ross Eric and Lin, Chen and Xie, Wensi, Corporate Resilience to Banking Crises: The Roles of Trust and Trade Credit (April 2016). NBER Working Paper No. w22153. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2762061

Ross Eric Levine (Contact Author)

University of California, Berkeley - Haas School of Business ( email )

545 Student Services Building, #1900
2220 Piedmont Avenue
Berkeley, CA 94720
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Chen Lin

The University of Hong Kong - Faculty of Business and Economics ( email )

Pokfulam Road
Hong Kong
China

Wensi Xie

The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) - CUHK Business School ( email )

Cheng Yu Tung Building
12 Chak Cheung Street
Shatin, N.T.
Hong Kong

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