Practicing Women, Peace and Security in Post-Conflict Reconstruction in International Law and Post-Conflict Reconstruction Policy

Practicing Women, Peace And Security in Post-Conflict Reconstruction in International Law and Post-Conflict Reconstruction Policy, edited by James Sweeney and Matthew Saul, Routledge, May 2015

Transitional Justice Institute Research Paper No. 16-09

Posted: 15 Apr 2016

See all articles by Aisling Swaine

Aisling Swaine

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - Centre for Women, Peace and Security

Date Written: April 15, 2016

Abstract

The advent of what is now referred to as the women, peace and security agenda (WPS), consisting of seven resolutions adopted by the UN Security Council, brought with it great expectations. The resolutions created hope that approaches to addressing armed conflict and post-conflict reconstruction would tackle entrenched gendered bias against women and become equitably reflective of the gendered economic, political and social justice concerns of both women and men. Since their adoption however, scholars and activists have critiqued the gaps that remain in securing implementation of the resolutions. As a chapter in a volume examining International Law and Post-Conflict Reconstruction Policy, this paper examines the tensions that arise between the potential gains that can be made for women under this framework, and the limited ways in which the resolutions have been conceptually developed and since inception, implemented. Through the example of Liberia’s National Action Plan on women, peace and security, this chapter examines the pros and cons of a bureaucratic translation of an international law instrument into a state-level administrative policy tool. The chapter highlights that such processes should be practically oriented towards tackling the root causes of the obstacles faced by women - the gender inequalities that pre-empted the conflict and endure in its aftermath.

Keywords: gender equality, women, peace and security, UN Security Council, Liberia, violence against women, Resolution 1325, feminist legal theory

Suggested Citation

Swaine, Aisling, Practicing Women, Peace and Security in Post-Conflict Reconstruction in International Law and Post-Conflict Reconstruction Policy (April 15, 2016). Practicing Women, Peace And Security in Post-Conflict Reconstruction in International Law and Post-Conflict Reconstruction Policy, edited by James Sweeney and Matthew Saul, Routledge, May 2015; Transitional Justice Institute Research Paper No. 16-09. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2765430

Aisling Swaine (Contact Author)

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - Centre for Women, Peace and Security ( email )

Houghton Street
London, WC2A 2AE
United Kingdom

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