The Willingness-to-Pay for Work/Family Policies: A Study of Teachers

Posted: 26 Aug 2001

See all articles by Robert W. Drago

Robert W. Drago

Pennsylvania State University - Department of Labor Studies and Industrial Relations

David Costanza

George Washington University - Department of Organizational Sciences

Robert D Caplan

Consultant

Tanya Brubaker

George Washington University - Department of Organizational Sciences

Darnell Cloud

North Carolina A&T State University

Naomi Harris

George Washington University - Department of Psychology

Russell Kashian

University of Wisconsin - Whitewater - Department of Economics

Lynn Riggs

Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC)

Abstract

Recent evidence suggests that employers and employees may benefit from work/family policies and that even non-beneficiaries may support such policies. The authors posit that these policies generate not only "use" values (values for those who rely on them), but also, based on a particular norm of social justice, "need" values (values received by all individuals, regardless of expectations of direct benefit). Combining the median voter model with the contingent valuation method, which was designed to measure the willingness-to-pay for environmental goods such as national parks, the authors capture the willingness-to-pay for seven distinct work/family policies within a sample of 343 public, elementary school teachers. The results suggest that referenda to initiate work/family policies in exchange for payroll deductions from teachers would pass, depending on the specific deduction. Even respondents with no expectation of direct benefit may place a positive value on the policies, consistent with the notion of "need" values.

Keywords: work and family, benefits, contingent valuation

JEL Classification: J30, J13

Suggested Citation

Drago, Robert W. and Costanza, David and Caplan, Robert D and Brubaker, Tanya and Cloud, Darnell and Harris, Naomi and Kashian, Russell and Riggs, Lynn, The Willingness-to-Pay for Work/Family Policies: A Study of Teachers. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=276872

Robert W. Drago (Contact Author)

Pennsylvania State University - Department of Labor Studies and Industrial Relations ( email )

University Park, PA 16802
United States
814-865-0751 (Phone)
814-863-3578 (Fax)

David Costanza

George Washington University - Department of Organizational Sciences ( email )

Suite 301
2136 Pennsylvania Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20052
United States
(202) 496-8387 (Phone)
(202) 676-5232 (Fax)

Robert D Caplan

Consultant ( email )

Redondo Beach, CA 90277
United States

Tanya Brubaker

George Washington University - Department of Organizational Sciences ( email )

Suite 301
2136 Pennsylvania Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20052
United States

Darnell Cloud

North Carolina A&T State University ( email )

Hillsborough Street
Greensboro, NC 27411
United States

Naomi Harris

George Washington University - Department of Psychology ( email )

DC
United States

Russell Kashian

University of Wisconsin - Whitewater - Department of Economics ( email )

800 West Main Street
Whitewater, WI 53190
United States

Lynn Riggs

Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) ( email )

1155 21st Street NW
Washington, DC 20581
United States

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