Climate Change Through an Intersectional Lens: Gendered Vulnerability and Resilience in Indigenous Communities in the United States

Vinyeta, Kirsten; Powys Whyte, Kyle; Lynn, Kathy. 2015. Climate change through an intersectional lens: gendered vulnerability and resilience in indigenous communities in the United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-923. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest

80 Pages Posted: 27 Apr 2016

See all articles by Kirsten Vinyeta

Kirsten Vinyeta

University of Oregon, College of Arts and Sciences, Environmental Studies Program, Students

Kyle Whyte

University of Michigan

Kathy Lynn

University of Oregon

Date Written: April 25, 2016

Abstract

The scientific and policy literature on climate change increasingly recognizes the vulnerabilities of indigenous communities and their capacities for resilience. The role of gender in defining how indigenous peoples experience climate change in the United States is a research area that deserves more attention. Advancing climate change threatens the continuance of many indigenous cultural systems that are based on reciprocal relationships with local plants, animals, and ecosystems. These reciprocal relationships, and the responsibilities associated with them, are gendered in many indigenous communities. American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians experience colonization based on intersecting layers of oppression in which race and gender are major determinants. The coupling of climate change with settler colonialism is the source of unique vulnerabilities. At the same time, gendered knowledge and gender-based activism and initiatives may foster climate change resilience. In this literature synthesis, we cross-reference international literature on gender and climate change, literature on indigenous peoples and climate change, and literature describing gender roles in Native America, in order to build an understanding of how gendered indigeneity may influence climate change vulnerability and resilience in indigenous communities in the United States.

Suggested Citation

Vinyeta, Kirsten and Whyte, Kyle Powys and Lynn, Kathy, Climate Change Through an Intersectional Lens: Gendered Vulnerability and Resilience in Indigenous Communities in the United States (April 25, 2016). Vinyeta, Kirsten; Powys Whyte, Kyle; Lynn, Kathy. 2015. Climate change through an intersectional lens: gendered vulnerability and resilience in indigenous communities in the United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-923. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2770089

Kirsten Vinyeta

University of Oregon, College of Arts and Sciences, Environmental Studies Program, Students

OR
United States

Kyle Powys Whyte (Contact Author)

University of Michigan ( email )

440 Church Street
Dana Building
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
United States

Kathy Lynn

University of Oregon ( email )

1280 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403
United States

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