International Organizations: Effectiveness and Accountability

25 Pages Posted: 3 May 2016

See all articles by Anne Peters

Anne Peters

Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law

Date Written: March 2, 2016

Abstract

International organizations are legal communities in a threefold sense: They are created by law, they use law as a means of governance, and they should be governed by the rule of law. Accordingly, international law constitutes, enables, and constrains international organizations. The paper shows that (with some simplification) legal scholarship until the 1990s was primarily concerned with the constituting and enabling function of the law (thus securing the effectiveness of international organizations), while the more recent legal concern is the constraining function of the law (thus improving the accountability of international organizations). In the procedural law of organizations, a tryptichon of accountability procedures has been built: transparency, participation, and access to justice.

Keywords: international organization, effectiveness, legitimacy, accountability, International organization, effectiveness, legitimacy, accountability, global constitutionalism, global administrative law, functionalism,privatization of IOs, transparency, participation, access to justice, democracy in IOs

Suggested Citation

Peters, Anne, International Organizations: Effectiveness and Accountability (March 2, 2016). Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law & International Law (MPIL) Research Paper No. 2016-01. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2770606 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2770606

Anne Peters (Contact Author)

Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law ( email )

Im Neuenheimer Feld 535
69120 Heidelberg, 69120
Germany

HOME PAGE: http://www.mpil.de

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