Cross-Cutting Conflicts: Developments in the Use of Norwich Orders in Internet Defamation Cases

T. L. Archibald & R.S. Echlin, eds., Annual Review of Civil Litigation 2016 (Toronto: Carswell, 2016), 129-161

50 Pages Posted: 6 May 2016 Last revised: 28 Mar 2017

See all articles by Robert J. Currie

Robert J. Currie

Dalhousie University - Schulich School of Law

Date Written: May 5, 2016

Abstract

The anonymity afforded to those wishing to post commentary on the internet has given rise to a number of procedural issues in Canadian case law. This paper focuses on one such issue: the need for prospective plaintiffs in defamation actions to "unmask" anonymous commentators in order to be able to bring proceedings against them. It tracks the increasing use of the "Norwich order," A.K.A an order for pre-action discovery, as a means of accomplishing this objective, by examining the leading case of Warman v. Fournier and analyzing how this issue has played out in litigation to date. It also considers the broader issue of how application of the values contained in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms ― particularly privacy and freedom of expression ― is affecting the disposal of procedural motions.

Keywords: Defamation, Internet, Civil Procedure, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Privacy, Freedom of Expression

JEL Classification: K13, K41

Suggested Citation

Currie, Robert J., Cross-Cutting Conflicts: Developments in the Use of Norwich Orders in Internet Defamation Cases (May 5, 2016). T. L. Archibald & R.S. Echlin, eds., Annual Review of Civil Litigation 2016 (Toronto: Carswell, 2016), 129-161. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2776176

Robert J. Currie (Contact Author)

Dalhousie University - Schulich School of Law ( email )

6061 University Avenue
6061 University Ave
Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4H9
Canada

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