Culture and Immigration: A Case for Exclusion?

Social Philosophy Today, Vol. 23: pp. 69–86, 2008

9 Pages Posted: 10 May 2016

See all articles by Alex Sager

Alex Sager

Portland State University

Date Written: 2008

Abstract

A number of prominent political philosophers, including Will Kymlicka and Joseph Carens, have suggested that one reason for limiting immigration is to protect culture. I situate this claim in the context of liberal nation-building and suggest that the arguments for the protection of culture are often vague, confused or tend to conflict with liberal commitments. When clear, they gain their plausibility from other concerns (e.g., self-defense), not cultural protection. Finally, given plausible empirical assumptions, the dangers to societal culture are considerably exaggerated and provide little reason for preventing immigration. I then briefly consider the case of general culture and whether there are some grounds to limit immigration to protect it, using the example of Iceland and aboriginal cultures to situate my arguments. Once again, I conclude that the appeal to culture to limit immigration is weak and philosophers searching for arguments against open borders should turn elsewhere.

Keywords: Culture, Immigration, Justice, Nationalism

Suggested Citation

Sager, Alexander, Culture and Immigration: A Case for Exclusion? (2008). Social Philosophy Today, Vol. 23: pp. 69–86, 2008. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2777181

Alexander Sager (Contact Author)

Portland State University ( email )

PO Box 751
Portland, OR 97207
United States

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
29
Abstract Views
159
PlumX Metrics