Impacts and Determinants of Health Levels in Low-Income Countries

86 Pages Posted: 9 May 2016

See all articles by Pascaline Dupas

Pascaline Dupas

Stanford University

Edward Miguel

University of California, Berkeley - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Date Written: May 2016

Abstract

Improved health in low-income countries could considerably improve wellbeing and possibly promote economic growth. The last decade has seen a surge in field experiments designed to understand the barriers that households and governments face in investing in health and how these barriers can be overcome, and to assess the impacts of subsequent health gains. This chapter first discusses the methodological pitfalls that field experiments in the health sector are particularly susceptible to, then reviews the evidence that rigorous field experiments have generated so far. While the link from in utero and child health to later outcomes has increasingly been established, few experiments have estimated the impacts of health on contemporaneous productivity among adults, and few experiments have explored the potential for infrastructural programs to impact health outcomes. Many more studies have examined the determinants of individual health behavior, on the side of consumers as well as among providers of health products and services.

Suggested Citation

Dupas, Pascaline and Miguel, Edward, Impacts and Determinants of Health Levels in Low-Income Countries (May 2016). NBER Working Paper No. w22235. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2777323

Pascaline Dupas (Contact Author)

Stanford University ( email )

Stanford, CA 94305
United States

Edward Miguel

University of California, Berkeley - Department of Economics ( email )

549 Evans Hall #3880
Berkeley, CA 94720-3880
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

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