Socioeconomic Inequity in Excessive Weight in Indonesia

25 Pages Posted: 19 May 2016

See all articles by Toshiaki Aizawa

Toshiaki Aizawa

Asian Development Bank Institute

Matthias Helble

Asian Development Bank; ADBI; ADBI

Date Written: May 15, 2016

Abstract

Exploiting the Indonesian Family Life Survey, this paper studies the transition of socioeconomic related disparity of excess weight, including overweight and obesity, from 1993 to 2014. First, we show that the proportions of overweight and obese people in Indonesia increased rapidly during the time period and that poorer income groups exhibited the strongest growth of excess weight. Using the concentration index we find that prevalence of overweight and obesity affected increasingly poorer segments of Indonesian society. Third, decomposing the concentration index of excess weight in 2000 and 2014 for both sexes, our results suggest that most parts of the concentration index can be explained by the unequal distribution of living standards, sanitary conditions, the possession of vehicles, and home appliances. Finally, decomposing the change in the concentration index of excess weight from 2000 to 2014, we show that a large part of the change can be explained by the decrease in inequality in living standards, and improved sanitary conditions and better availability of home appliances in poorer households.

Keywords: obesity prevalence, socioeconomic disparity, Indonesian Family Life Survey

JEL Classification: I14, I15, I18, I24

Suggested Citation

Aizawa, Toshiaki and Helble, Matthias, Socioeconomic Inequity in Excessive Weight in Indonesia (May 15, 2016). ADBI Working Paper 572, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2780206 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2780206

Toshiaki Aizawa (Contact Author)

Asian Development Bank Institute ( email )

Kasumigaseki Building 8F
3-2-5, Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo, 100-6008
Japan

Matthias Helble

Asian Development Bank ( email )

Philippines
006326831120 (Phone)

ADBI ( email )

Kasumigaseki Building 8F
3-2-5, Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo, 100-6008
Japan

ADBI ( email )

Kasumigaseki Building 8F
3-2-5, Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo, 100-6008
Japan

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