What is the Marginal Benefit of Payment-Induced Family Care?

45 Pages Posted: 16 May 2016

See all articles by Norma Coe

Norma Coe

University of Pennsylvania - Perelman School of Medicine

Jing Guo

American Institutes for Research

R. Tamara Konetzka

University of Chicago

Courtney Van Houtven

Duke University

Date Written: May 2016

Abstract

Research on informal and formal long-term care has centered almost solely on costs; to date, there has been very little attention paid to the benefits. This study exploits the randomization in the Cash and Counseling Demonstration and Evaluation program and instrumental variable techniques to gain causal estimates of the effect of family involvement in home-based care on health care utilization and health outcomes. We find that family involvement significantly decreases Medicaid utilization. Importantly, we find family involvement significantly lowers the likelihood of urinary tract infections, respiratory infections, and bedsores, suggesting that the lower utilization is due to better health outcomes.

Suggested Citation

Coe, Norma and Guo, Jing and Konetzka, R. Tamara and Van Houtven, Courtney, What is the Marginal Benefit of Payment-Induced Family Care? (May 2016). NBER Working Paper No. w22249. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2780259

Norma Coe (Contact Author)

University of Pennsylvania - Perelman School of Medicine ( email )

423 Guardian Drive
Philadelphia, PA 19104
United States

Jing Guo

American Institutes for Research ( email )

1990 K Street, NW
Washington, DC 20006-1107
United States

R. Tamara Konetzka

University of Chicago ( email )

1101 East 58th Street
Chicago, IL 60637
United States

Courtney Van Houtven

Duke University ( email )

100 Fuqua Drive
Durham, NC 27708-0204
United States

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