On the Surprising Use of Unenforceable Contract Terms: Evidence from the Residential Rental Market

Harvard John M. Olin Center for Law, Economics, and Business, Discussion Paper No. 61, 2015

93 Pages Posted: 25 May 2016 Last revised: 29 Jun 2016

Date Written: May 22, 2016

Abstract

This paper explores the prevalence of unenforceable terms in consumer contracts. Taking the residential rental market in the Greater Boston Area as a test case, the study analyzes a sample of 70 leases in terms of Massachusetts Landlord and Tenant Law. The paper’s findings reveal that landlords frequently use legally dubious — as well as clearly invalid — provisions in their contracts. Building on psychological insights and on a survey-based study of 279 tenants, the paper suggests that such clauses may significantly affect tenants’ decisions and behavior. In particular, when a problem or a dispute with the landlord arises, tenants are likely to perceive the terms in the lease contract as enforceable and forgo valid legal rights and claims. In light of this evidence, the paper discusses preliminary policy prescriptions.

Keywords: contracts, residential law, housing law, empirical legal research

Suggested Citation

Furth-Matzkin, Meirav, On the Surprising Use of Unenforceable Contract Terms: Evidence from the Residential Rental Market (May 22, 2016). Harvard John M. Olin Center for Law, Economics, and Business, Discussion Paper No. 61, 2015, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2782987 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2782987

Meirav Furth-Matzkin (Contact Author)

University of Chicago - Law School ( email )

1111 E. 60th St.
Chicago, IL 60637
United States

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Downloads
226
Abstract Views
1,310
rank
149,765
PlumX Metrics