Bohemians and Diversity – Are They Different to Other Creative Occupations?

79 Pages Posted: 5 Jun 2016

See all articles by Sveta Angelopoulos

Sveta Angelopoulos

RMIT University - School of Economics, Finance and Marketing

Sarah Sinclair

RMIT University

Jonathan Boymal

School of Economics, Finance and Marketing, RMIT University

Ashton de Silva

RMIT University - School of Economics, Finance and Marketing

Jason Potts

RMIT University

Date Written: May 3, 2016

Abstract

The creative contribution to regional development, where creative people and industries choose to position themselves and how to attract and retain them, continues to be debated. There are many occupations that comprise 'creatives' ranging from managerial, sales, marketing and human resources to the arts, entertainment, publishing and broadcasting. Each of these occupational groups is unlikely to have the same locational opportunities and preferences or effect on regional development. The particular focus of this paper is the bohemian class, a group of creatives that is of particular interest, given the unique and well-documented contribution they can make to an economy. Our findings suggest that diversity and tolerance have different impacts on different occupational types. This highlights the importance of a more disaggregated approach to exploring the determinants of creative workers' locational choices.

Keywords: Creative class, regional growth, diversity, Bohemian, Quantile regression

JEL Classification: J11, J21, O18, P46

Suggested Citation

Angelopoulos, Sveta and Sinclair, Sarah and Boymal, Jonathan and de Silva, Ashton and Potts, Jason, Bohemians and Diversity – Are They Different to Other Creative Occupations? (May 3, 2016). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2789944 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2789944

Sveta Angelopoulos (Contact Author)

RMIT University - School of Economics, Finance and Marketing ( email )

Level 12, 239 Bourke Street
Melbourne, Victoria 3000
Australia

Sarah Sinclair

RMIT University ( email )

GPO Box 2476V
Melbourne 3001, Victoria
Australia

Jonathan Boymal

School of Economics, Finance and Marketing, RMIT University ( email )

124 La Trobe Street
Melbourne, 3000
Australia

Ashton De Silva

RMIT University - School of Economics, Finance and Marketing ( email )

124 La Trobe Street
Level 11, Building 80 RMIT University
Melbourne, 3000
Australia
+61399251313 (Phone)
+61399255986 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://www.rmit.edu.au/contact/staff-contacts/academic-staff/d/de-silva-dr-ashton

Jason Potts

RMIT University ( email )

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