High-Skilled Migration in Times of Global Economic Crisis

IMI (International Migration Institute) Working Papers Series 2016, No. 126

University of Western Australia Economics Discussion Paper 16.16

Sloan Foundation Economics Research Paper 2791018

34 Pages Posted: 7 Jun 2016

See all articles by Mathias Czaika

Mathias Czaika

University of Oxford - Department of International Development

Christopher Parsons

University of Oxford; International Migration Institute

Date Written: 2016

Abstract

We introduce two pioneering databases in order to analyze the implications of the Global Economic Crisis on international migration. The first details inflows of migrant workers of 185 nationalities to 10 OECD destinations, disaggregated by skill level (highly skilled and otherwise), between 2000 and 2012. The second comprises immigration policies implemented by 19 OECD countries between 2000 and 2012. We distinguish between six skill-selective admission policies, six post-entry policy instruments and three bilateral agreements. Subsequently we present preliminary analysis of these data against the backdrop of the Global Economic Crisis. The Global Economic Crisis negatively affected annual inflows of both highly and other skilled migrants between 2007 and 2009, although they resumed their upward trend thereafter. The starkest trends in policy terms include: the emergence and rapid diffusion of student job seeker visas, the relative stability in the prevalence of skill selective policies in the wake of the Global Economic Crisis, a greater use of financial incentives to attract high-skilled workers and increased employer transferability for migrants at destination.

Suggested Citation

Czaika, Mathias and Parsons, Christopher, High-Skilled Migration in Times of Global Economic Crisis (2016). IMI (International Migration Institute) Working Papers Series 2016, No. 126; University of Western Australia Economics Discussion Paper 16.16; Sloan Foundation Economics Research Paper 2791018. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2791018 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2791018

Mathias Czaika (Contact Author)

University of Oxford - Department of International Development ( email )

3 Mansfield Road
Oxford, OX1 3TB
United Kingdom
+44(0)1865 271533 (Phone)

Christopher Parsons

University of Oxford ( email )

Mansfield Road
Oxford, Oxfordshire OX1 4AU
United Kingdom

International Migration Institute ( email )

3 Mansfield Road
Oxford, OX1 3TB
United Kingdom

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