'Graceful Pillars': Law, Religion, and the Ethics of the 'Daughter Track'

Journal of Law and Religion, July 2016

33 Pages Posted: 8 Jun 2016 Last revised: 2 Sep 2016

See all articles by M. Christian Green

M. Christian Green

Emory University - Center for the Study of Law and Religion

Date Written: March 23, 2016

Abstract

In this essay, analyzing the “daughter track” of daughter-provided elder care, through feminist philosopher Lisa Tessman’s “burdened virtues” framework, I examine the ethical questions surrounding gender, sacrifice, and elder care on the daughter track, particularly concerning contexts of virtue and necessity. Second, I examine how Tessman’s “burdened virtues” framework applies to the “daughter track” situation, particularly regarding virtues born of necessity. Third, I examine some wider legal and social justice issues that remain unresolved in eldercare provision by daughters. Finally, I conclude with some reflections on the “daughter track” as a law and religion issue and how law, in particular, might better support women in being not only “dutiful daughters,” but “graceful pillars,” in the care of their elders.

Keywords: Law and Religion, Family Law, Feminist Philosophy, Ethics of Care, Eldercare

Suggested Citation

Green, M. Christian, 'Graceful Pillars': Law, Religion, and the Ethics of the 'Daughter Track' (March 23, 2016). Journal of Law and Religion, July 2016, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2791185 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2791185

M. Christian Green (Contact Author)

Emory University - Center for the Study of Law and Religion ( email )

201 Dowman Drive
Atlanta, GA 30322
United States

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