Inequality, Economic Development, and the New Regional Community

43 SW. L. REV. 569 (2014)

21 Pages Posted: 10 Jun 2016

See all articles by Patience A. Crowder

Patience A. Crowder

University of Denver Sturm College of Law

Date Written: 2014

Abstract

Many of today’s social justice challenges stem from the post-Great Recession economy’s creation of new wealth while simultaneously expanding the wealth gap. This article explores the idea of a new national strategy for regional economic development by conducting a comparative analysis of the theoretical underpinnings of community economic development (CED) and regional economic development. The article posits that the post-Great Recession economy and the concomitant expansion of suburban poverty throughout our metropolitan regions compels the need to implement new poverty alleviation mechanisms through an intersection of reformed schemes of community CED and regional economic development. This article argues that effectively addressing metropolitan poverty necessitates that (1) CED theory and practice move beyond local neighborhood boundaries to develop programs to support our regional communities, and (2) regional economic development theories and programs extend beyond business recruitment and development to encompass notions of poverty alleviation. The article presents regional innovation clusters, geographic concentrations of interconnected businesses and other service providers, as a possible mechanism for effectuating these outcomes.

Suggested Citation

Crowder, Patience A., Inequality, Economic Development, and the New Regional Community (2014). 43 SW. L. REV. 569 (2014). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2792357

Patience A. Crowder (Contact Author)

University of Denver Sturm College of Law ( email )

2255 E. Evans Avenue
Denver, CO 80208
United States

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