Towards a Brain-to-Society Systems Model of Individual Choice

Marketing Letters, Volume 19, Issue 3, pp 323-336

Posted: 24 Jun 2016

See all articles by Laurette Dube

Laurette Dube

McGill University - Desautels Faculty of Management

Antoine Bechara

University of Southern California

Ulf Böckenholt

McGill University - Desautels Faculty of Management

Asim Ansari

Columbia Business School - Marketing

Alain Dagher

McGill University - Division of Experimental Medicine

Mark Daniel

University of South Australia

Wayne S. DeSarbo

Pennsylvania State University

Lesley Fellows

McGill University - Division of Experimental Medicine

Ross A. Hammond

Brookings Institution - Center on Social and Economic Dynamics

Terry Huang

NICHD

Scott Huettel

Duke University - Department of Psychology and Neuroscience

Yan Kestens

University of Montreal

Bärbel Knäuper

McGill University - Department of Psychology

Peter Kooreman

Tilburg University - Center and Faculty of Economics and Business Administration; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Spencer Moore

Queen's University

A. Smidts

Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM)

Date Written: December 1, 2008

Abstract

Canonical models of rational choice fail to account for many forms of motivated adaptive behaviors, specifically in domains such as food selections. To describe behavior in such emotion- and reward-laden scenarios, researchers have proposed dual-process models that posit competition between a slower, analytic faculty and a fast, impulsive, emotional faculty. In this paper, we examine the assumptions and limitations of these approaches to modeling motivated choice. We argue that models of this form, though intuitively attractive, are biologically implausible. We describe an approach to motivated choice based on sequential sampling process models that can form a solid theoretical bridge between what is known about brain function and environmental influences upon choice. We further suggest that the complex and dynamic relationships between biology, behavior, and environment affecting choice at the individual level must inform aggregate models of consumer choice. Models using agent-based complex systems may further provide a principled way to relate individual and aggregate consumer choices to the aggregate choices made by businesses and social institutions. We coin the term “brain-to-society systems” choice model for this broad integrative approach.

Keywords: Choice models, Dual-process models, Agent systems, Sequential sampling process models, Motivated adaptive behavior, Neuroscience, Neuroeconomics

Suggested Citation

Dube, Laurette and Bechara, Antoine and Böckenholt, Ulf and Ansari, Asim and Dagher, Alain and Daniel, Mark and DeSarbo, Wayne S. and Fellows, Lesley and Hammond, Ross A. and Huang, Terry and Huettel, Scott and Kestens, Yan and Knäuper, Bärbel and Kooreman, Peter and Moore, Spencer and Smidts, Ale, Towards a Brain-to-Society Systems Model of Individual Choice (December 1, 2008). Marketing Letters, Volume 19, Issue 3, pp 323-336. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2795742

Laurette Dube

McGill University - Desautels Faculty of Management ( email )

1001 Sherbrooke St. West
Montreal, Quebec H3A1G5 H3A 2M1
Canada
514-398-4026 (Phone)
514-398-3876 (Fax)

Antoine Bechara

University of Southern California ( email )

2250 Alcazar Street
Los Angeles, CA 90089
United States

Ulf Böckenholt

McGill University - Desautels Faculty of Management ( email )

1001 Sherbrooke St. West
Montreal, Quebec H3A1G5 H3A 2M1
Canada

Asim Ansari

Columbia Business School - Marketing ( email )

New York, NY 10027
United States

Alain Dagher

McGill University - Division of Experimental Medicine

Montreal, Quebec
Canada

Mark Daniel

University of South Australia ( email )

37-44 North Terrace, City West Campus
Adelaide, South Australia 5001
Australia

Wayne S. DeSarbo (Contact Author)

Pennsylvania State University ( email )

University Park
State College, PA 16802
United States

Lesley Fellows

McGill University - Division of Experimental Medicine

Montreal, Quebec
Canada

Ross A. Hammond

Brookings Institution - Center on Social and Economic Dynamics ( email )

1775 Massachusetts Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20036
United States

Terry Huang

NICHD

31 Center Drive
Building 31, Room 2A32
Bethesda, MD 20892-2425
United States

Scott Huettel

Duke University - Department of Psychology and Neuroscience ( email )

Durham, NC 27708
United States

Yan Kestens

University of Montreal

C.P. 6128 succursale Centre-ville
Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7
Canada

Bärbel Knäuper

McGill University - Department of Psychology

1205 Dr. Penfield Ave.
Montreal, Quebec H3A 1B1
Canada

Peter Kooreman

Tilburg University - Center and Faculty of Economics and Business Administration ( email )

P.O. Box 90153
Tilburg, 5000 LE
Netherlands

HOME PAGE: http://www.peterkooreman.nl

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

Spencer Moore

Queen's University ( email )

Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6
Canada

Ale Smidts

Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM) ( email )

P.O. Box 1738
3000 DR Rotterdam
Netherlands

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