The Paradox of Freedom of Religion in Post-Revolutionary Egypt

Pieter Coertzen, M. Christian Green, and Len Hansen (eds.) Religious Freedom and Religious Pluralism in Africa: Prospects and Limitations (AFRICAN SUN MeDIA, 2016)

20 Pages Posted: 22 Jun 2016 Last revised: 26 Jun 2016

See all articles by Mohamed Abdelaal

Mohamed Abdelaal

Alexandria University - Faculty of Law; Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Date Written: June 25, 2016

Abstract

This essay highlights the puzzle of the political significance that Article 2 of the Egyptian Constitution, which lists the principles of the Islamic sharia as the main source of legislation, might have. In doing so, the essay traces the historical background of Article 2 in an attempt to show how this Article found its way into Egypt’s Constitutions. Additionally, the essay examines the SCC’s interpretation of Article 2 and how the Court developed a unique methodology to reach a liberal interpretation of it that has been followed by several other Muslim countries. Finally, we will then try to answer the question of whether Article 2 is really applicable in Egypt.

Suggested Citation

Abdelaal, Mohamed, The Paradox of Freedom of Religion in Post-Revolutionary Egypt (June 25, 2016). Pieter Coertzen, M. Christian Green, and Len Hansen (eds.) Religious Freedom and Religious Pluralism in Africa: Prospects and Limitations (AFRICAN SUN MeDIA, 2016). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2797609

Mohamed Abdelaal (Contact Author)

Alexandria University - Faculty of Law ( email )

Moustafa Mshrafa st.
Souter
Alexandria
Egypt

Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law ( email )

530 West New York Street, Lawrence W. Inlow Hall
Indianapolis, IN Indiana 46202
United States

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