Purchase - $5.00

Can War Foster Cooperation?

48 Pages Posted: 20 Jun 2016  

Michal Bauer

Charles University in Prague - Institute of Economic Studies; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Christopher Blattman

University of Chicago, Harris School of Public Policy; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Julie Chytilová

Charles University in Prague - Department of Economics

Joseph Henrich

Harvard University; Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR)

Edward Miguel

University of California, Berkeley - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Tamar Mitts

Columbia University, Department of Political Science, Students

Multiple version iconThere are 3 versions of this paper

Date Written: June 2016

Abstract

In the past decade, nearly 20 studies have found a strong, persistent pattern in surveys and behavioral experiments from over 40 countries: individual exposure to war violence tends to increase social cooperation at the local level, including community participation and prosocial behavior. Thus while war has many negative legacies for individuals and societies, it appears to leave a positive legacy in terms of local cooperation and civic engagement. We discuss, synthesize and reanalyze the emerging body of evidence, and weigh alternative explanations. There is some indication that war violence especially enhances in-group or "parochial" norms and preferences, a finding that, if true, suggests that the rising social cohesion we document need not promote broader peace.

Keywords: Cooperation, post-conflict development, social preferences, war

JEL Classification: C80, D74, H56, O10, O12, O40

Suggested Citation

Bauer, Michal and Blattman, Christopher and Chytilová, Julie and Henrich, Joseph and Miguel, Edward and Mitts, Tamar, Can War Foster Cooperation? (June 2016). CEPR Discussion Paper No. DP11327. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2798116

Michal Bauer (Contact Author)

Charles University in Prague - Institute of Economic Studies ( email )

Opletalova 26
Prague 1, 110 00
Czech Republic
+420 222 112 317 (Phone)
+420 222 112 304 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://ies.fsv.cuni.cz/index.php?module=kernel&action=user&id_user=183&lng=en_GB

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

Christopher Blattman

University of Chicago, Harris School of Public Policy ( email )

1101 East 58th Street
Chicago, IL 60637
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) ( email )

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Julie Chytilová

Charles University in Prague - Department of Economics ( email )

Opletalova 26
Prague 1, 163 00
Czech Republic

HOME PAGE: http://ies.fsv.cuni.cz/index.php?module=kernel&action=user&id_user=130&lng=cs_CZ

Joseph Henrich

Harvard University ( email )

1875 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR) ( email )

180 Dundas Street West, Suite 1400
Toronto, Ontario
Canada

Edward Miguel

University of California, Berkeley - Department of Economics ( email )

549 Evans Hall #3880
Berkeley, CA 94720-3880
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Tamar Mitts

Columbia University, Department of Political Science, Students ( email )

New York, NY
United States

Paper statistics

Downloads
0
Abstract Views
124