Indigenous Masculinities in a Changing Climate: Vulnerability and Resilience in the United States

Men, Masculinities and Disaster. 2016. Edited by Elaine Enarson, Bob Pease. Routledge: Chapter 12

13 Pages Posted: 28 Jun 2016  

Kirsten Vinyeta

University of Oregon, College of Arts and Sciences, Environmental Studies Program, Students

Kyle Whyte

Michigan State University - Department of Philosophy

Kathy Lynn

University of Oregon

Date Written: June 24, 2016

Abstract

Gender shapes Indigenous vulnerability and resilience due to the coupled social and ecological challenges of climate change in Indigenous communities in the United States (Maynard, 1998; Grossman and Parker, 2012; Bennett et al., 2014; Maldonado et al., 2014; Whyte, 2014). Despite its relevance, little research has analyzed the ways in which gender shapes climate change experiences. Even less research has focused on the impacts of climate change on Indigenous masculinity. With this backdrop, we foreground Indigenous men and masculinities with respect to climate change vulnerability and resilience. We open this chapter by briefly describing pre-contact Indigenous conceptions of gender in the US, followed by a discussion of how settlement has affected gender roles, relations and gendered traditional knowledge in Indigenous communities. We then describe some of the ways in which Indigeneity and masculinity are intersecting (or may intersect) with climate change in four key arenas: health, migration and displacement, economic and professional development, and culture. We follow this with a discussion of Indigenous men’s roles in political resistance and climate change resilience. We conclude by summarizing the key implications for Indigenous climate change initiatives and for the ongoing reconstruction and reassertion of Indigenous gender identities.

Keywords: Climate change, indigenous peoples, feminism, gender, vulnerability, climate justice

Suggested Citation

Vinyeta, Kirsten and Whyte, Kyle and Lynn, Kathy, Indigenous Masculinities in a Changing Climate: Vulnerability and Resilience in the United States (June 24, 2016). Men, Masculinities and Disaster. 2016. Edited by Elaine Enarson, Bob Pease. Routledge: Chapter 12. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2800469

Kirsten Vinyeta

University of Oregon, College of Arts and Sciences, Environmental Studies Program, Students

OR
United States

Kyle Powys Whyte (Contact Author)

Michigan State University - Department of Philosophy ( email )

368 Farm Lane #503
South Kedzie Hall
East Lansing, MI 48824
United States
5174321034 (Phone)
5174321320 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://www.philosophy.msu.edu/people/faculty/kyle-powys-whyte/

Kathy Lynn

University of Oregon ( email )

1280 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403
United States

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