Developing Countries and the Fundamental Principles of International Space Law

New Directions in International Law, (Frankfurt), 1982

24 Pages Posted: 29 Jun 2016

See all articles by Ram S. Jakhu

Ram S. Jakhu

McGill University - Institute of Air and Space Law

Date Written: 1982

Abstract

Abstract by B. Goswami: “This article reflects on the balance of rights and obligations of developed and developing countries in the context of International Space Law. It is often purported that the developing countries did not get to actively participate in the formation of International Law, since much of it was either derived from the European Christian nations or from the subsequent political powers who could enter the group of civilized nations. Until this point, most of today’s developing nations were colonized by these very powers and the interests of the decolonized new states were not addressed and therefore they collectively often seek revision of principles in International Law. However, International Space Law does address and safeguard the interest of the developing nations through the principles laid down in Outer Space Treaty. These principles were carefully drafted, negotiated and intentionally put inside the operative part of the treaty so as to guarantee interests of whole international community rather just the space powers. This paper delves into these principles and concludes how the interpretation of the same should balance the interests of developed and developing nations.”

Suggested Citation

Jakhu, Ram S., Developing Countries and the Fundamental Principles of International Space Law (1982). New Directions in International Law, (Frankfurt), 1982. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2801388

Ram S. Jakhu (Contact Author)

McGill University - Institute of Air and Space Law ( email )

3690, Peel Street,
Montreal, Quebec H3A 1W9
Canada

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