Mothers Who Kill: Cross­Cultural Patterns in and Perspectives on Contemporary Maternal Filicide

International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, Vol. 26, Pp. 493-514, 2003

Santa Clara Univ. Legal Studies Research Paper No. 08­16

23 Pages Posted: 8 Jul 2016

See all articles by Michelle Oberman

Michelle Oberman

Santa Clara University - School of Law

Date Written: 2003

Abstract

This article presents a brief cross-cultural review of maternal filicide, focusing specifically on the varying circumstances that surround the mothers who commit this crime. My goal is not to provide a comprehensive map of contemporary maternal filicide, but rather, to illustrate the manner in which a society’s structure of motherhood and women’s status contributes to maternal filicide. Special attention will be paid to the unwritten norms that govern women and motherhood, as well as to the manner in which distinct societies understand, rationalize, and punish maternal filicide.

Keywords: Maternal Filicide, United States, India, Fiji, Hungary

Suggested Citation

Oberman, Michelle, Mothers Who Kill: Cross­Cultural Patterns in and Perspectives on Contemporary Maternal Filicide (2003). International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, Vol. 26, Pp. 493-514, 2003 ; Santa Clara Univ. Legal Studies Research Paper No. 08­16. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2805658

Michelle Oberman (Contact Author)

Santa Clara University - School of Law ( email )

500 El Camino Real
Santa Clara, CA 95053
United States

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