Persistent Social Networks: Civil War Veterans Who Fought Together Co-Locate in Later Life

30 Pages Posted: 18 Jul 2016

See all articles by Dora L. Costa

Dora L. Costa

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Matthew E. Kahn

University of Southern California; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Christopher Roudiez

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Sven Eric Wilson

Brigham Young University - Department of Political Science

Date Written: July 2016

Abstract

At the end of the U.S Civil War, veterans had to choose whether to return to their prewar communities or move to new areas. The late 19th Century was a time of sharp urban growth as workers sought out the economic opportunities offered by cities. By estimating discrete choice migration models, we quantify the tradeoffs that veterans faced. Veterans were less likely to move far from their origin and avoided urban immigrant areas and high mortality risk areas. They also avoided areas that opposed the Civil War. Veterans were more likely to move to a neighborhood or a county where men from their same war company lived. This co-location evidence highlights the existence of persistent social networks. Such social networks had long-term consequences: veterans living close to war time friends enjoyed a longer life.

Suggested Citation

Costa, Dora L. and Kahn, Matthew E. and Roudiez, Christopher and Wilson, Sven Eric, Persistent Social Networks: Civil War Veterans Who Fought Together Co-Locate in Later Life (July 2016). NBER Working Paper No. w22397. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2810914

Dora L. Costa (Contact Author)

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - Department of Economics ( email )

Box 951477
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1477
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Matthew E. Kahn

University of Southern California ( email )

2250 Alcazar Street
Los Angeles, CA 90089
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Christopher Roudiez

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) ( email )

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Sven Eric Wilson

Brigham Young University - Department of Political Science ( email )

Provo, UT 84602
United States

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
13
Abstract Views
200
PlumX Metrics