Popular Culture and Legal Pluralism: Narrative as Law

Adams, Wendy A. Popular Culture and Legal Pluralism: Narrative as Law. Routledge, 2016.

1 Pages Posted: 28 Jul 2016  

Wendy A. Adams

McGill University - Faculty of Law

Date Written: July 4, 2016

Abstract

Drawing upon theories of critical legal pluralism and psychological theories of narrative identity, this book argues for an understanding of popular culture as legal authority, unmediated by translation into state law. In narrating our identities, we draw upon collective cultural narratives, and our narrative/nomos obligational selves become the nexus for law and popular culture as mutually constitutive discourse.

The author demonstrates the efficacy and desirability of applying a pluralist legal analysis to examine a much broader scope of subject matter than is possible through the restricted perspective of state law alone. The study considers whether presumptively illegal acts might actually be instances of a re-imagined, alternative legality, and the concomitant implications. As an illustrative example, works of critical dystopia and the beliefs and behaviours of eco/animal-terrorists can be understood as shared narrative and normative commitments that constitute law just as fully as does the state when it legislates and adjudicates.

This book will be of great interest to academics and scholars of law and popular culture, as well as those involved in interdisciplinary work in legal pluralism.

Keywords: law and humanities, legal pluralism, law and popular culture, law and literature, posthumanism

Suggested Citation

Adams, Wendy A., Popular Culture and Legal Pluralism: Narrative as Law (July 4, 2016). Adams, Wendy A. Popular Culture and Legal Pluralism: Narrative as Law. Routledge, 2016.. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2813212

Wendy Ann Adams (Contact Author)

McGill University - Faculty of Law ( email )

3644 Peel Street
Montreal H3A 1W9, Quebec
Canada

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