Regulating Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Ships: The Role of the International Maritime Organization

Forthcoming in "Ocean Law Debates: The 50-Year Legacy and Emerging Issues for the Years Ahead," eds. H. Scheiber, N. Oral and M. Kwon

22 Pages Posted: 29 Jul 2016

See all articles by Daniel Bodansky

Daniel Bodansky

Arizona State University Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law

Date Written: May 1, 2016

Abstract

Three international regimes are relevant to the regulation of greenhouse gas emissions from maritime transport: (1) the UN climate change regime; (2) the International Maritime Organization; and (3) the UN Law of the Sea Convention (UNCLOS). This essays surveys the three regimes and their interactions, focusing on the International Maritime Organization and, in particular, the 2011 amendments to MARPOL Annex VI. Although the MARPOL Annex VI amendments constitute the only binding sectoral agreement adopted to date to limit greenhouse gases, IMO action falls well short of what is needed to combat climate change, and it is unclear whether and when the IMO might adopt additional measures, such as a market-based mechanism.

Keywords: Climate change, International Maritime Organization, maritime emissions, UNCLOS, UNFCCC

JEL Classification: K32, K33

Suggested Citation

Bodansky, Daniel, Regulating Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Ships: The Role of the International Maritime Organization (May 1, 2016). Forthcoming in "Ocean Law Debates: The 50-Year Legacy and Emerging Issues for the Years Ahead," eds. H. Scheiber, N. Oral and M. Kwon. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2813785

Daniel Bodansky (Contact Author)

Arizona State University Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law ( email )

111 E Taylor St
Phoenix, AZ 85004
United States

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