Call Me Maybe: Experimental Evidence on Using Mobile Phones to Survey Microenterprises

49 Pages Posted: 1 Aug 2016  

Robert Garlick

Duke University - Department of Economics

Kate Orkin

University of Oxford - Department of Economics

Simon Quinn

University of Oxford

Date Written: July 27, 2016

Abstract

High-frequency data is useful to measure volatility, reduce recall bias, and measure dynamic treatment effects. We conduct the first experimental evaluation of high-frequency phone surveys in a developing country or with microenterprises. We randomly assign microenterprise owners to monthly in-person, weekly in-person, or weekly phone interviews. We find high-frequency phone surveys are useful and accurate. Phone and in-person surveys yield similar measurements, with few large or significant differences in reported outcome means or distributions. Neither interview frequency nor medium affects reported outcomes in a common in-person endline. Phone surveys reduce costs without increasing permanent attrition from the panel.

Suggested Citation

Garlick, Robert and Orkin, Kate and Quinn, Simon, Call Me Maybe: Experimental Evidence on Using Mobile Phones to Survey Microenterprises (July 27, 2016). Economic Research Initiatives at Duke (ERID) Working Paper No. 224. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2816064 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2816064

Robert Garlick (Contact Author)

Duke University - Department of Economics ( email )

213 Social Sciences Building
Box 90097
Durham, NC 27708-0204
United States

Kate Orkin

University of Oxford - Department of Economics ( email )

Mansfield Road
Oxford, Oxfordshire OX1 4AU
United Kingdom

HOME PAGE: http://https://sites.google.com/site/kateorkin/home

Simon R. Quinn

University of Oxford ( email )

Paper statistics

Downloads
45
Abstract Views
698