Work‐Related Training and the Probability of Transitioning from Non‐Permanent to Permanent Employment

24 Pages Posted: 5 Aug 2016

See all articles by Duncan McVicar

Duncan McVicar

Queen's University Belfast; Queen's University Belfast - Queen's Management School

Mark Wooden

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Ning Li

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research

Felix Leung

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute (MIAESR)

Date Written: September 2016

Abstract

It is widely believed that work‐related training increases a worker's probability of moving up the job‐quality ladder. This is usually couched in terms of effects on wages, but it has also been argued that training increases the probability of moving from non‐permanent forms of employment to more permanent employment. This hypothesis is tested using nationally representative panel data for Australia, a country where the incidence of non‐permanent employment, and especially casual employment, is high by international standards. While a positive association between participation in work‐related training and the subsequent probability of moving from either casual or fixed‐term contract employment to permanent employment is observed among men, this is shown to be driven not by a causal impact of training on transitions but by differences between those who do and do not receive training, that is selection bias.

Suggested Citation

McVicar, Duncan and Wooden, Mark and Li, Ning and Leung, Felix, Work‐Related Training and the Probability of Transitioning from Non‐Permanent to Permanent Employment (September 2016). British Journal of Industrial Relations, Vol. 54, Issue 3, pp. 623-646, 2016. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2818771 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjir.12182

Duncan McVicar (Contact Author)

Queen's University Belfast ( email )

25 University Square
Belfast, BT7 1NN
Ireland

Queen's University Belfast - Queen's Management School

Riddel Hall
185 Stranmillis Road
Belfast, BT9 5EE
United Kingdom

Mark Wooden

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research ( email )

Level 5, FBE Building, 111 Barry Street
Parkville, Victoria 3010
Australia

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

Ning Li

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research ( email )

Level 5, FBE Building, 111 Barry Street
Parkville, Victoria 3010
Australia

Felix Leung

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute (MIAESR) ( email )

Level 5, FBE Building, 111 Barry Street
161 Barry Street
Carlton, VIC 3053
Australia

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