Knowing What Not to Do is a Critical Job Skill: Evidence from 10 Different Scoring Methods

17 Pages Posted: 17 Aug 2016

Date Written: September 2016

Abstract

Situational judgment tests (SJTs) have become an increasingly important tool for predicting employee performance; however, at least two key areas warrant further investigation. First, prior studies of SJTs have generally relied on samples from the western world, leaving open the question of the validity of using SJTs in the developing world where the majority of the world's workforce resides. Second, there is currently no standardized, theoretically‐based method for the development and scoring of SJTs. Therefore, SJTs are highly domain‐specific and must be developed anew for each new context. We report the results of three studies, conducted in India, that aim to: (1) test the cross‐cultural validity of SJTs in a non‐western context, and (2) examine the differential validity of 10 different approaches to scoring SJTs, some of which have the potential to resolve the problem of developing a theoretically‐infused, standardized approach to scoring and future development.

Suggested Citation

Stemler, Steven E. and Aggarwal, Varun and Nithyanand, Siddharth, Knowing What Not to Do is a Critical Job Skill: Evidence from 10 Different Scoring Methods (September 2016). International Journal of Selection and Assessment, Vol. 24, Issue 3, pp. 229-245, 2016, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2824747 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijsa.12143

Steven E. Stemler (Contact Author)

Wesleyan University ( email )

Middletown, CT 06459
United States

Varun Aggarwal

Aspiring Minds

323 Udyog Vihar
Phase II
Gurgaon, 122016
India

Siddharth Nithyanand

Aspiring Minds

323 Udyog Vihar
Phase II
Gurgaon, 122016
India

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