Intellectual Property Rights and North-South Trade

33 Pages Posted: 28 May 2004 Last revised: 28 Jul 2010

See all articles by Judith C. Chin

Judith C. Chin

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Gene M. Grossman

Princeton University - Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Princeton University - Department of Economics; CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute); Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR); National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Date Written: November 1988

Abstract

We study the incentive that a government in the South has to protect the intellectual property rights of Northern firms, and the consequences of the decision taken by the South for welfare in the North and for efficiency of the world equilibrium. We conduct our analysis in the context of a competition between a single Northern producer and a single Southern producer selling some good to an integrated world market. In this competition, only the Northern firm has the ability to conduct R&D in order to lower its production costs, but the Southern firm can imitate costlessly if patent protection for process innovations is not enforced by the government of the South. We find that the interests of the North and the South generally conflict in the matter of protection of intellectual property, with the South benefiting from the ability to pirate technology and the North harmed by such actions. A strong system of intellectual property rights may or may not enhance world efficiency.

Suggested Citation

Chin, Judith C. and Grossman, Gene M., Intellectual Property Rights and North-South Trade (November 1988). NBER Working Paper No. w2769. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=282680

Judith C. Chin

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Gene M. Grossman (Contact Author)

Princeton University - Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs ( email )

300 Fisher Hall
Prospect Avenue
Princeton, NJ 08544-1021
United States
609-258-4823 (Phone)
609-258-1374 (Fax)

Princeton University - Department of Economics ( email )

Princeton, NJ 08544-1021
United States

CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute) ( email )

Poschinger Str. 5
Munich, DE-81679
Germany

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
107
Abstract Views
2,168
rank
249,917
PlumX Metrics