The Geographical Imagination

Gieseking, J. Geographical Imagination. In International Encyclopedia of Geography (eds. D. Richardson, N. Castree, M. Goodchild, A. Jaffrey, W. Liu, A. Kobayashi, and R. Marston). New York: Wiley-Blackwell and the Association of American Geographers. 2017 Forthcoming

8 Pages Posted: 30 Aug 2016  

Jen Jack Gieseking

American Studies, Trinity College

Date Written: August 25, 2016

Abstract

Geographers attach multiple definitions to the term geographical imagination, many of which can be traced back to the work of Hugh Prince, David Harvey, and Derek Gregory. The term is most often used in relation to understandings of the landscape, the power of maps, studies of identity and oppression, and/or meanings of large territories as they relate to everyday lives such as the city, nature, or the nation-state. At its best, the geographical imagination affords the user ways to pry open the power of assumptions, stereotypes, and expectations associated with space and place, and to delve into how and why they are linked.

Keywords: geographical imagination, geographical imaginary, geographic theory, humanistic geography, image, visualization, imagination, spatial cognition

Suggested Citation

Gieseking, Jen Jack, The Geographical Imagination (August 25, 2016). Gieseking, J. Geographical Imagination. In International Encyclopedia of Geography (eds. D. Richardson, N. Castree, M. Goodchild, A. Jaffrey, W. Liu, A. Kobayashi, and R. Marston). New York: Wiley-Blackwell and the Association of American Geographers. 2017 Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2829604

Jen Jack Gieseking (Contact Author)

American Studies, Trinity College ( email )

300 Summit Street
Hartford, CT 06106
United States

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