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When do extreme weather events generate attention to climate change?

Climatic Change, 143 (1-2), 227-241. doi:10.1007/s10584-017-1984-2

15 Pages Posted: 27 Aug 2016 Last revised: 8 Jul 2017

Matthew R. Sisco

Columbia University

Valentina Bosetti

Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM); Bocconi University; CMCC - Euro Mediterranean Centre for Climate Change

Elke U. Weber

Columbia Business School - Management & Psychology

Date Written: May 29, 2017

Abstract

We analyzed the effects of 10,748 weather events on attention to climate change between December 2011 and November 2014 in local areas across the USA. Attention was gauged by quantifying the relative increase in Twitter messages about climate change in the local area around the time of each event. Coastal floods, droughts, wildfires, strong wind, hail, excessive heat, extreme cold, and heavy snow events all had detectable effects. Attention was reliably higher directly after events began, compared to directly before. Financial damage associated with the weather events had a positive and significant effect on attention, although the effect was small. The abnormality of each weather event’s occurrence compared to local historical activity was also a significant predictor. In particular and in line with past research, relative abnormalities in temperature (local warming) generated attention to climate change. In contrast, wind speed was predictive of attention to climate change in absolute levels. These results can be useful to predict short-term attention to climate change for strategic climate communications and to better forecast long-term climate policy support.

Keywords: Climate Attention, Social Media, Extreme Weather

JEL Classification: Q54, C81, D80

Suggested Citation

Sisco, Matthew R. and Bosetti, Valentina and Weber, Elke U., When do extreme weather events generate attention to climate change? (May 29, 2017). Climatic Change, 143 (1-2), 227-241. doi:10.1007/s10584-017-1984-2 . Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2830438 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2830438

Matthew Sisco (Contact Author)

Columbia University ( email )

3022 Broadway
New York, NY 10027
United States

Valentina Bosetti

Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM) ( email )

C.so Magenta 63
Milano, 20123
Italy

Bocconi University ( email )

Via Gobbi 5
Milan, 20136
Italy

CMCC - Euro Mediterranean Centre for Climate Change

Viale Gallipoli, 49
Lecce, 73100
Italy

Elke Weber

Columbia Business School - Management & Psychology ( email )

3022 Broadway
New York, NY 10027
United States

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