Long-Term Effects of Male Circumcision on Risky Sexual Behaviors and STD Infections: Evidence from Malawian Schools

Posted: 26 Oct 2016 Last revised: 18 Apr 2017

See all articles by Hyuncheol Kim

Hyuncheol Kim

Cornell University

Jaehyun Jung

Columbia University

Booyuel Kim

KDI School of Public Policy and Management

Cristian Pop-Eleches

Columbia University - School of International & Public Affairs (SIPA)

Date Written: October 1, 2016

Abstract

The introduction of risk-reducing technology can lead to unintended consequences, especially when risk compensation can be one of potential operating mechanism to offset the positive impact. For male circumcision, its preventive effect against HIV infection might diminish if circumcised men engage in riskier sexual behaviors. The purpose of this study is to investigate risk-compensating behavior after medical male circumcision in the long run. We randomly provided free male circumcision surgery to 2,667 adolescent male students at secondary schools in Malawi and conducted long-term follow-up survey after about four years. We find that male students who received the offer more intensively were 35 percent more likely to be infected with HSV-2 than the other students, suggesting riskier sexual behavior after circumcision. Self-reported sexual behavior, meanwhile, are showing little-to-no evidence of practicing riskier sex after circumcision, except for the inconsistent use of condom.

Suggested Citation

Kim, Hyuncheol and Jung, Jaehyun and Kim, Booyuel and Pop-Eleches, Cristian (Kiki), Long-Term Effects of Male Circumcision on Risky Sexual Behaviors and STD Infections: Evidence from Malawian Schools (October 1, 2016). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2833153

Hyuncheol Kim

Cornell University ( email )

Ithaca, NY 14853
United States

Jaehyun Jung (Contact Author)

Columbia University ( email )

3022 Broadway
New York, NY 10027
United States

Booyuel Kim

KDI School of Public Policy and Management ( email )

P.O. Box 184
Seoul, 130-868
Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

Cristian (Kiki) Pop-Eleches

Columbia University - School of International & Public Affairs (SIPA) ( email )

420 West 118th Street
New York, NY 10027
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.columbia.edu/~cp2124

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