‘Ulster Says No’: Regulating the Consumption of Commercial Sex Spaces and Services in Northern Ireland

28 Pages Posted: 15 Sep 2016 Last revised: 21 Sep 2018

See all articles by Paul Maginn

Paul Maginn

The University of Western Australia

Graham Ellison

Queen's University Belfast - School of Law

Date Written: September 13, 2016

Abstract

Commercial forms of sex such as prostitution/sex work, strip clubs and even sex shops have been the subject of much political debate and policy regulation over the last decade or so in the UK and Ireland. These myriad forms of commercial sex and land usage have managed to survive and even thrive in the face of public outcry and regulation. Despite being part of the UK we suggest that Northern Ireland has steered its own regulatory course, whereby the consumption of commercial sexual spaces and services have been the subject of intense moral and legal oversight in ways that are not apparent in other UK regions. Nevertheless, in spite of this we also argue that the context of Northern Ireland may provide some lessons for the ways that religious values and moral reasoning can influence debates on commercial sex elsewhere.

Keywords: prostitution, sex work, sectarianism, christian right, Nordic Model, gender, masculinity

Suggested Citation

Maginn, Paul and Ellison, Graham, ‘Ulster Says No’: Regulating the Consumption of Commercial Sex Spaces and Services in Northern Ireland (September 13, 2016). Urban Studies, Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2838663

Paul Maginn

The University of Western Australia ( email )

35 Stirling Highway
Crawley, Western Australia 6009
Australia

Graham Ellison (Contact Author)

Queen's University Belfast - School of Law ( email )

School of Law
Belfast BT7 1NN, BT7 1NN
Ireland

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