Genetically Modified Organisms: How the United States' and the European Union's Regulations Affect the Economy

Katharine Gostek, Genetically Modified Organisms: How the United States' and the European Union's Regulations Affect the Economy, 24 Mich. St. Int'l L. Rev. 761 (2016).

40 Pages Posted: 29 Sep 2016

See all articles by Katharine Gostek

Katharine Gostek

Michigan State University, College of Law, Students

Date Written: September 25, 2016

Abstract

Genetically engineered (GE) foods have been commercialized for nearly two decades and continue to be produced globally with no sign of slowing down. The use of biotechnology to genetically engineer or modify plants — by inserting or deleting specific genetic information — has become an integral part of our society. Unsurprisingly, the United States (U.S.) is the world’s largest producer of GE crops. In contrast, many nations, especially within the European Union (EU), such as Switzerland, France, Austria, and Italy, have banned cultivation of genetically modified crops within their borders. In recent years, debates around the world have arisen regarding the risks of cultivating and consuming genetically modified foods.

Keywords: international law, food law, GMOs, European Union, EU, genetics

Suggested Citation

Gostek, Katharine, Genetically Modified Organisms: How the United States' and the European Union's Regulations Affect the Economy (September 25, 2016). Katharine Gostek, Genetically Modified Organisms: How the United States' and the European Union's Regulations Affect the Economy, 24 Mich. St. Int'l L. Rev. 761 (2016).. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2843337

Katharine Gostek (Contact Author)

Michigan State University, College of Law, Students ( email )

318 Law College Building
East Lansing, MI 48824-1300
United States

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